Thursday, February 23, 2006

Kinnie Starr was Interviewed by Shelagh Rogers on Sounds Like Canada today - listen to it HERE. I'm not a really big fan of her music, but the interview was very good. They discussed National Geographic's article about love - the same neurotransmitters that love fires in our brains are also fired by mental illness and danger. This brain reaction has also been compared to LSD.
So, if you take someone on dangerous dates it creates a pathway in the brain that makes it more likely for you to score!!
I like how candid Kinnie is about her break-up with a long term boyfriend, the effects of early sex in a realtionship, and being single.

9 comments:

elisabeth said...

oh man i wish i would have known that when we were dating...you would have given in for sure if i had thrown you into a hippo's cage first!

phyllis sweetwater said...

that's the most useful information i've gotten in a while, a theory worth testing! i've always likes kinny star since i saw her at north country fair in 98 and since she went to school with veda hille and oh susanna

Seaneria said...

In regards to the neuroscience of love, the same can be said about any complex behavior though, when boiled down to its roots it is just synaptic firing resuting in different levels of neurotransmitter release thats interpretted differently. I really liked her interview and especially the comments on the importance of song writing... for me it's becoming more song writing, but I'm not good enough yet in the limitations of the form, so it's mainly poetry still to deal with the complexities of life. It's such a fantastic way to conceptualize and solidify emotions as well as to give yourself an opportunity to work through the issue. In keeping with a suggestion I made to Halli, this is one of my favorite poems... Michael Ondaatje's "the Time Around Scars':

A girl whom I've not spoken to
or shared coffee with for several years
writes of an old scar.
On her wrist it sleeps, smooth and white,
the size of a leech.
I gave it to her
brandishing a new Italian penknife.
Look, I said turning,
and blood spat onto her shirt.

My wife has scars like spread raindrops
on knees and ankles,
she talks of broken greenhouse panes
and yet, apart from imagining red feet,
(a nymph out of Chagall)
I bring little to that scene.
We remember the time around scars,
they freeze irrelevant emotions
and divide us from present friends.
I remember this girl's face,
the widening rise of surprise.

And would she
moving with lover or husband
conceal or flaunt it,
or keep it at her wrist
a mysterious watch.
And this scar I then remember
is a medallion of no emotion.

I would meet you now
and I would wish this scar
to have been given with
all the love
that never occurred between us.

Enjoy...

elisabeth said...

i have a book by michael ondatje sitting unread on my shelf. maybe it's time to read it. he sounds good. have you read this book sean?

Seaneria said...

Depends what book...I've only read his poetry but he is the Gov. General Award Winner for his novel "The English Patient" (movie based on it...) so if its a novel nope.

elisabeth said...

oh right i guess it would have helped if i had mentioned the name of the book...
it's called "in the skin of a lion"

Seaneria said...

Nope... as I understand though that one is about the imigrants that helped to "build" Toronto. It sounds interesting becase it was controversial for its focus on story telling rather than the rigid historical line one would expect from such a piece...if you enjoy it let me know.

elisabeth said...

i will surely blog it if it's worthy.

phyllis sweetwater said...

i think cbc voted "in the skin of a lion" the book every canadian should read. well i havent read it yet either, but i will. his poetry is beautiful. so to add to the theory about danger and love, i've also realized that just watching something dangerous might be enough to get the synaptic fires burning. dont ask me how i know.